Categories: clam_chatter
      Date: Mar 18, 2013
     Title: College Clam Check-In: Will Ryan
Checking in with freshman Johns Hopkins goalie Will Ryan.

With more and more Clams considering Division 1 offers, the questions about what the recruiting process and the college experience are like keep coming it.  To give you some insight we reached out to our current Division 1 Clam Alumni to tell their stories.

WILL RYAN
FRESHMAN
AVON OLD FARMS
2012 CLAM ALUMNUS

What were you're top choices for colleges when you started thinking about playing lacrosse in college and why?

University of Delaware, Fairfield University, Dartmouth College, Johns Hopkins University

What surprised you most about the recruiting process?

How quick things can change and how important it is to always keep your options open and to respond to each coach that reaches out to you regardless if you are interested or not. Make sure to be sincere with every note, college coaches switch all the time.

If there was one thing you'd do differently in your recruiting process, what would it be and why?

I would have focused more on my academics. Academics are a huge factor for top schools for lacrosse.  The fact that I didn’t have great grades really hurt me with my options early in the process.

What would you say was the most important part of your recruiting process and why?

Most important part of my recruiting process was the coaches that supported me. Between my coaches on the clams Justin Walker, Troy Peters, Tim Fallon, and Alec Corliss and then my coach at Avon Skip Flanagan. They were the biggest factors in my recruiting process, because they gave college coaches more confidence in my ability through their recommendations and conversations to each [college] coach.

What advise would you give a Clam who is about to meet a college coach on a recruiting visit for the first time?

I would say go into the office with confidence, give him a firm hand shake and look him right in the eye.  It might sound a little cliché but coaches want to understand the person they are recruiting and this sends a good message. Also bring questions to ask the coach about the university. They will try and sell their university to the player and the purpose of the visit is to understand everything about the school and not just all the great aspects in which the coach presents to you.

What was the most surprising part of D1 lacrosse when you experienced your first week?

The most surprising part of D1 lacrosse to me was the coaches expect you to keep up the second you hit the field, so you must prepare yourself all summer to be ready to play at a D1 pace. The coaches won’t wait for you to catch up; they don’t have time.

What is your daily schedule (i.e.- practice, weight room, classes, film, study halls, etc.)?

Daily schedule

-Class from 9-12:45

-Get to the  locker room around 2:30

-Film 3-4

-Practice 4-6:30

-Depending on the day lift from 7-8

-Study hours from 8:30-10:30

- Go to bed around 11:30

What do you like MOST about playing D1 college lacrosse?  Why?

The hard work, everyone on this team wants to win and wants to work hard. The difference from high school is everyone on your team wants to be the best they can and maximize their ability. It creates a hard working and competitive atmosphere that you can really thrive in.

What do you like LEAST about playing D1 college lacrosse?  Why?

There is nothing right now I can think of that I least like about playing lacrosse. It's tough to balance school and lacrosse, but I wouldn’t change that. I enjoy playing lacrosse more than just about anything and I am so happy that I chose to play at a school that cares so much about lacrosse as well as academics.

What is the number one thing you want a D1 Clam prospect to know about playing D1 lacrosse?

Choose a school you love and you can see yourself going to regardless of lacrosse, academics first, lacrosse comes second although it may not feel like that when you are at school. Its important to go somewhere you really love. If you don’t love the school you won’t love 6am lifts, four days a week in the cold of winter.